Preventing Attacks Through the Web

The Web is a dangerous place. A recent Osterman Research survey found that 73% of mid-sized and large organizations have had malware infiltrate their corporate networks through the Web during the previous 12 months. By contrast, malware has successfully infiltrated through email in 59% of organizations and through social media in 17%. Our data is corroborated by Palo Alto Networks’ research that finds 90% of malware attacks come through Web browsers.

What should you do to protect your corporate network from the bad stuff that can be (and probably will be) delivered through your Web browser? The traditional approach is to adopt a defense-in-depth approach of intrusion detection, intrusion prevention, URL filtering, anti-virus, sandboxing and other technologies that will create something of a gauntlet through which bad stuff must pass before reaching users. This works to a great extent, but is by no means a guarantee that all malware will be stopped.

Another approach is offered by Spikes Security, a new company that isolates Web traffic in a centralized server. Instead of trying to detect malware or pass through only “safe” content to Web users, the solution makes the assumption that all content is bad and so passes through nothing. Instead, the AirGap solution converts Web traffic to compressed and optimized pixels that are then delivered to users who view them through a lightweight client that the company claims installs easily, requires no special configuration, and offers good video and audio performance. In essence, Web users are simply viewing a video feed of Web content instead of the actual Web content itself. AirGap provides end-to-end encryption for Web traffic and claims that its proprietary client/server protocol cannot be compromised by malware. Each user session is isolated via a hardware-assisted virtual machine.

Pricing for AirGap ranges from $5.13 to $9.00 per user per month depending on the number of users (sessions) and the length of the software license.

The concept of AirGap is a simple one and should be completely effective at preventing attacks that come through Web browsers. The only downside – and it might be a significant one for some organizations – is that at this point only the AirGap client can be used to view Web traffic, not individual browsers via a plug-in. While this won’t be a showstopper for most organizations, it could be for some that depend on plug-ins for some Web functionality.

All in all, AirGap is a fairly elegant approach to the increasingly perilous issue of Web-borne malware.

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