Monitor Your Social Media Exposure

Social media is an amazingly useful tool to share meaningful information (along with lots of drivel, humblebrags and photos of that amazing breakfast your friends are about to eat in Cancun). However, the ease with which social media can be used as a vehicle for sharing good information enables users to share some really stupid things, as well. The most recent case in point is the (now former) CBS Vice President and senior counsel who posted some very insensitive comments on Facebook about the victims of the horrific shooting in Las Vegas earlier this week. In 2016 a (now former) faculty member of York University in Toronto posted links on Facebook to anti-Semitic web sites and made a number of derogatory comments about Jews. Also in 2016, a (now former) employee of Express Oil Change and Tire Engineers in Alabama posted on Facebook that the wildfire victims of Gatlinburg, Tennessee are, “….mouth-breathing, toothless, diabetic, cousin-humpin, mountain-dew-chuggin, moon-pie-munchin, pall-mall-smoking, trump-suckin pond scum.” In 2013, the (now former) communications chair of the Democratic Party of Sacramento County, California tweeted to the senior communications adviser to Ted Cruz, “May your children all die from debilitating, painful and incurable diseases”.

These types of posts represent a lack of self-control, something of which the vast majority of us are guilty at one time or another (but, hopefully, in less public ways). But they also represent a massive liability for a company’s brand. In each case, the offender was fired by his or her employer, but that does little to mitigate the enormous damage that these types of posts can inflict on the innocent employers who get caught up in the firestorm that normally ensues after these types of posts go viral.

As an employer, what can you do about this? Here are some suggestions:

  • First and foremost, establish detailed and thorough policies about what constitutes acceptable and unacceptable employee behavior, both during and after work hours. Obviously, an employer has less control over their employees when they’re not at work, but some reference to acting like a decent human being on a 24×7 basis while employed by the company is a good starting point.
  • To back up these policies, provide good training for employees about how to respond to social media posts, how to avoid making inappropriate comments on social media, and how to escalate sensitive issues like customer complaints.
  • Implement good monitoring, DLP and scanning technologies for all work-related systems, including social media. The goal is not only to identify intentionally inappropriate and mistaken posts from employees, but also to protect against data loss and malware infiltration through the social media channel, to identify if a social media account has been hacked, or to identify if someone is falsely purporting to be a representative of your company/brand.
  • Archive content from your social media channels, including any employee posts made using company infrastructure. Having a good archive of social media content will enable decision makers, counsel, etc. to review social media posts for inappropriate content after the fact, and can be useful as part of litigation efforts and regulatory audits.
  • For social media accounts under company control, enable appropriate access controls to minimize the potential for inappropriate posts.
  • Where necessary, implement a supervisory program (something akin to what financial services firms do for broker-dealers) that will sample employee social media posts to look for violations of corporate policy.

We will shortly be publishing a white paper and survey results focused on social media security and archiving. Let us know if you’d like to see an advance copy of the survey results or the paper.

Some Thoughts on IBM Verse

I returned this week from ConnectED, IBM’s annual conference in Orlando, formerly named Lotusphere. A key emphasis of the conference was IBM Verse, the company’s new business email platform that is designed to go head-to-head with Office 365, Gmail and Amazon’s upcoming WorkMail, among other platforms.

Verse represents a paradigm shift in email. Where Outlook represented a major shift in the way people work with email by integrating calendar, scheduling and task management functions into a single interface, I believe Verse represents the same level of paradigm shift because of its integration with the social aspects of email. Even though a substantial proportion of business email today is application-to-person (newsletters, travel reservations, notifications, etc.), for most business users the primary reason they use email is to send information to other people, to collaborate with them, and to manage projects with employees and others – a concept that Verse’s designers had as their central focus. Verse has a very social feel to it, prominently displaying the individuals with whom you’re communicating and collaborating most often, and making suggestions about who you might want to add to your “A” list across the top of the interface.

Verse makes extensive use of Watson-based analytics to adapt to individual work and collaboration styles and provides useful information about incoming email, users, projects, etc. Watson has the potential to make Verse extraordinarily useful because of its ability to prioritize messages based on a wide variety of parameters and its “knowledge” about senders, content and the like. Verse makes extensive use of social technologies to provide information about others in an organization and your relationship to them, similar to the old Atlas for Lotus Connections. Plus, chat in Verse is powered by Sametime, IBM’s well-established, real-time communication technology.

IBM will be offering an on-premises version of Verse in the second quarter of 2015, but this likely will not include a thick client – Verse is likely to remain a browser-only offering until at least 2016. I’m unconvinced that not offering a Verse thick client is a good idea.

In a significant shift from IBM’s standard delivery model, Verse will be a freemium offering that will include an “ibmverse.com” address and a decent amount of storage. Watson’s capabilities will not be available in the freemium version, but will be in the paid version. IBM will offer the ability to import contact information so that social relationships can be identified and established.

The market for Verse will be varied. Obviously, IBM will be going after its current base of Notes/Domino users, since these companies already have a strong relationship with the IBM brand and represent a logical migration path for existing Notes users. The more difficult avenue for IBM will be Gmail users, a group of at least 500 million, many millions of whom are business users, that represents an enormous potential market for Verse, but one more difficult to crack. However, IBM is smart to go after this group because Verse provides a more elegant, useful and intuitive interface than Gmail; and the addition of Watson analytics and social interaction extend its utility further still.

Will Verse be able to penetrate the Office 365 market? Microsoft currently has more than 9.2 million Office 365 Home and Personal subscribers and in excess of 30 million total users. This is going to be a more difficult market for IBM to penetrate given that Microsoft has done a good job at providing robust functionality in their cloud offering, the fact that they own the desktop for productivity applications, and that email with a large mailbox is already included in the offering.

There are other markets IBM could go after, as well, such as the several million remaining GroupWise users that will be migrating to other platforms; and the tens of millions of Zimbra users.

So, what’s the future of Verse going to look like? I believe Verse could very definitely be a game-changer, albeit with a few “ifs”:

  • If IBM’s marketing can be streamlined to make information and pricing on Verse easily accessible to Gmail and similar types of users. IBM offers excellent technology as exemplified in Verse, but its marketing operation is currently too bureaucratic – the company has become very innovative in its design approach and needs to do the same thing for its marketing.
  • If IBM provides straightforward email migration services that allow existing mailboxes from just about any platform to be easily migrated into Verse.
  • If IBM educates the market sufficiently to help prospective users and decision makers understand the significant benefits from the integration of social, email and real-time communication into a single platform.
  • If IBM can convince business and IT decision makers that making life easier and more productive for their end users is in their best interest (it is, by the way).

The bottom line: Verse is a fantastic, game-changing platform that could significantly alter the business email market if it’s marketed correctly.