How Secure Can Your Company Be?

Last week, Cisco released an interesting report entitled Maximizing the value of your data privacy investments. Among the various findings from the in-depth, 18-country survey discussed in this report is that organizations that are mostly or completely enabled to satisfy the compliance requirements of the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) had a significantly smaller number of data breaches during the past year than their counterparts that are least prepared to satisfy the requirements of the GDPR.

One one level, that’s good news: 89 percent of organizations that are not yet ready for GDPR experienced a data breach, while only 74 percent of GDPR-ready organizations experienced a breach. Clearly, GDPR is having a positive impact on data security.

Then again, that’s not particularly good news: even after going to the significant expense and difficulty associated with GDPR compliance, 74 percent of organizations still experienced a data breach! Of course, we would expect that figure to drop in the future given that the GDPR went into force only about eight months ago, but three in four GDPR-ready organizations still experiencing a data breach is very high.

This kind of result prompts a bigger question: just how secure can any organization be in the context of security? Given that we face a well-funded, intelligent, and collaborative set of adversaries in the cybercriminal community that will always have a guaranteed advantage (we need to protect every point of ingress while they need to break into just one), what is the lowest possible number of data breaches, malware infections, account takeovers, successful DDoS attacks, etc. that we can ever hope to achieve? Could a large organization not experience even one data breach in the course of a year? Could it not experience even a single malware infection? Could it prevent every insider threat? Could every CFO recognize every CEO Fraud attempt?

Probably not. So what is the target at which we’re aiming? A senior executive team or board of directors that is asked by the CIO for a 20 percent budget increase to improve security probably should know what they can expect to gain from that kind of investment. A vendor marketing a new technology to combat CEO Fraud or account takeovers would find it beneficial to their sales and marketing efforts if they could provide some concrete metrics about what their prospective customers could hope to gain by implementing their solution. Vendors of security awareness training would be well served by being able to report an X-percent reduction in successful phishing or ransomware incursions after employees were properly trained.

In short, it’s highly unlikely that any organization will ever reduce the success of cybercriminals’ efforts against them to zero. But what can we reasonably expect to achieve?

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