Archiving as a Customer Service Tool

We live in a suburb of Seattle and, like most of us who live in Western Washington, we have lots of trees in our neighborhood. One of the consequences of our winter storms is that our trees lose a number of limbs. To get rid of the tree debris each winter, about 16 years ago we and our neighbors purchased a gas-powered chipper from a company in northwestern Vermont called Country Home Products.

A pulley on the chipper shattered and I needed to order a new one. I tried to purchase a replacement part locally, but was told to contact Country Home Products directly, which I did. I didn’t remember the model number of the chipper and I didn’t have a part number for the broken pulley. However, I told the rep our address and that the broken pulley “was the larger one on the right as you face the housing.” He quickly brought up our purchase record from their database, knew the exact model of chipper we had purchased, and knew exactly what part we needed. The part was shipped and it was the right one.

We hear lots about archiving for purposes of regulatory compliance, litigation support, eDiscovery and the like — mostly defensive reasons just in case we need old data to satisfy a regulatory audit or address a legal action. But archiving can also be used as a customer service tool. In my case, a vendor’s customer service rep was able to immediately access my records from 16 years earlier and he knew more about my purchase and the specific replacement part I needed than I did.

That’s the kind of service that satisfies customers and builds brand loyalty — enabled because someone opted to keep their customer records in an easily accessible archive.